donderdag 30 april 2015

Allen voor Een, Een voor Allen Graphic Design Wim Brusse Eva Besnyö Company Photography


Uitgave Nederlandse Verbruikscoöperaties - Rotterdam 1952
Eva Besnyö – Nieuwe Fotografie Movement
Posted by From the Bygone

Photographer and photojournalist Eva Besnyö was born in Budapest on April 29, 1910, who participated in the Nieuwe Fotografie (New Photography) movement.

In 1928 she began a two-year course of studies at the renowned József Pécsi Portrait, Advertising and Architecture Studio, where she also did her apprenticeship. In 1930 at the age of 20 she decided to move to Berlin, metropolis of the avant-garde, not only in order to get away from home but also in order to leave the Hungary of the Horthy regime. Later she referred to her stay in Berlin as the most important period of her life, meaning that it laid the foundations not only of her photographic practice but also of her political awareness. She became part of the social and political circle of intellectuals which included György Kepes, Joris Ivens, Lászlo Moholy-Nagy, Otto Umbehr and Robert Capa. In 1931, she opened her own studio where she was successful in receiving agency work. Her well-known photograph of the gipsy boy with a cello on his back stems from that period.

Beacause of the political climate she moved to Amsterdam in 1932 with her Dutch friend John Fernhout whom she married. With the assistance of Charley Toorop, she participated in exhibitions which led to commissions in press photography, portraits, fashion and architecture. Her solo exhibition in the Van Lier art gallery in 1933 consolidated her recognition in the Netherlands. Besnyö experienced a further breakthrough with her architectural photography only a few years later: translating the idea of functionalist “New Building” into a “New Seeing”

After the war she again received commis sions for docu mentary work but became less active as she raised her two children fathered by the graphic designer Wim Brusse. In the 1970s, she was active in the Dutch feminist movement Dolle Mina, fighting for equal rights and photographing street protests.

Wim Brusse (1910-1978), as the son of a publisher, he was exposed to typography, publicity and printing matters as a child. He studied at the Royal Academy of The Hague. After having worked in a progressive advertising agency, he set up his own studio.
EB-Selfportrait-1952
Eva Besnyö Selfportrait 1952

Eva-Besnyo_1939
Eva Besnyö, 1939

EB-Budapest-1929
Eva Besnyö Budapest 1929

eva_besnyo_shadow_play-web
Eva Besnyö Shadow play web

 eb13-web
Eva Besnyö 

eb01-web
Eva Besnyö 

tumblr_lho5eyE54T1qcl8ymo1_500
Eva Besnyö 
















Allen voor Een, Een voor Allen Graphic Design Wim Brusse Eva Besnyö Company Photography


Uitgave Nederlandse Verbruikscoöperaties - Rotterdam 1952
Eva Besnyö – Nieuwe Fotografie Movement
Posted by From the Bygone

Photographer and photojournalist Eva Besnyö was born in Budapest on April 29, 1910, who participated in the Nieuwe Fotografie (New Photography) movement.

In 1928 she began a two-year course of studies at the renowned József Pécsi Portrait, Advertising and Architecture Studio, where she also did her apprenticeship. In 1930 at the age of 20 she decided to move to Berlin, metropolis of the avant-garde, not only in order to get away from home but also in order to leave the Hungary of the Horthy regime. Later she referred to her stay in Berlin as the most important period of her life, meaning that it laid the foundations not only of her photographic practice but also of her political awareness. She became part of the social and political circle of intellectuals which included György Kepes, Joris Ivens, Lászlo Moholy-Nagy, Otto Umbehr and Robert Capa. In 1931, she opened her own studio where she was successful in receiving agency work. Her well-known photograph of the gipsy boy with a cello on his back stems from that period.

Beacause of the political climate she moved to Amsterdam in 1932 with her Dutch friend John Fernhout whom she married. With the assistance of Charley Toorop, she participated in exhibitions which led to commissions in press photography, portraits, fashion and architecture. Her solo exhibition in the Van Lier art gallery in 1933 consolidated her recognition in the Netherlands. Besnyö experienced a further breakthrough with her architectural photography only a few years later: translating the idea of functionalist “New Building” into a “New Seeing”

After the war she again received commis sions for docu mentary work but became less active as she raised her two children fathered by the graphic designer Wim Brusse. In the 1970s, she was active in the Dutch feminist movement Dolle Mina, fighting for equal rights and photographing street protests.

Wim Brusse (1910-1978), as the son of a publisher, he was exposed to typography, publicity and printing matters as a child. He studied at the Royal Academy of The Hague. After having worked in a progressive advertising agency, he set up his own studio.
EB-Selfportrait-1952
Eva Besnyö Selfportrait 1952

Eva-Besnyo_1939
Eva Besnyö, 1939

EB-Budapest-1929
Eva Besnyö Budapest 1929

eva_besnyo_shadow_play-web
Eva Besnyö Shadow play web

 eb13-web
Eva Besnyö 

eb01-web
Eva Besnyö 

tumblr_lho5eyE54T1qcl8ymo1_500
Eva Besnyö 
















dinsdag 28 april 2015

Bridge Babies Dorothy W. Wilson Terribly Awesome Photo Books Erik Kessels Paul Kooiker Photography


Bridge Babies Wilson, Dorothy W., Heines Pub. Co. "A Gift of Smiles", nd, c1961, illus. soft cover, unpaginated, full page B & W portrait illus. (of babies), sm 8vo, "I Thought We Were Playing No Trump"



Erik Kessels / Paul Kooiker, Terribly awesome photo books 30 x 37 cm 64 pages news paper print edition of 1000 ISBN 9789490800093 

For several years, Paul Kooiker and Erik Kessels have organized evenings for friends in which they share the strangest photo books in their collections. The books shown are rarely available in regular shops, but are picked up in thrift stores and from antiquaries. The group’s fascination for these pictorial non-fiction books comes from the need to find images that exist on the fringe of regular commercial photo books. It’s only in this area that it’s possible to find images with an uncontrived quality. What’s noticeable from these publications is that there’s a thin line between being terrible and being awesome. This constant tension makes the books interesting. It’s also worth noting that these tomes all fall within certain categories: the medical, instructional, scientific, sex, humour or propaganda. Paul Kooiker and Erik Kessels have made a selection of their finest books from within this questionable new genre.








zaterdag 25 april 2015

Children of Europe David Seymour Life Magazine Unesco Photojournalism Photography

Children of Europe
David Seymour

orig photo-pictorial wrappers spiral bound, plates printed in gravure text in English, French and Spanish
In 1948 Chim accepted an assignment to take photographs for a UNICEF book intended to show the horrid condition of needy children in postwar Europe and the work undertaken by the United Nations agency to ameliorate their situation.

Chim did not work as a photojournalist during World War II. He ran a photo-finishing business in New York and then served as a photo-interpreter with the U.S. army in Europe from 1942 to 1945. In 1947 Chim, Capa, and Cartier-Bresson fulfilled their long-held desire to form a new kind of picture agency. Together with English photographer George Rodger, they founded Magnum Photos, an international photographic cooperative with editorial independence.

In 1948 Chim accepted an assignment to take photographs for a UNICEF book intended to show the horrid condition of needy children in postwar Europe and the work undertaken by the United Nations agency to ameliorate their situation. For Chim it was a perfect project. He had always liked being around children and loved to photograph them. As a staunch pacifist, he knew that nothing could speak more poignantly to the senseless destruction of war than the plight of these innocent victims.

In twelve weeks Chim traveled to his native Poland and to Hungary, Austria, Italy, and Greece. No other series better demonstrates his deeply ingrained humanitarian sympathies, and the profoundly moving photographs are widely considered to be among his best work. Forty-seven of the approximately 5,000 photographs that Chim took appear in the UNICEF book Children of Europe (1949). Select images also were published in leading magazines throughout the world, including eleven in Life's 1948 Christmas issue.


Chim's "Children of Europe" from ChimsChildrenOfEurope on Vimeo.













David Seymour. “Blind Boy Reading With His Lips”. 1948. Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
This photograph could have been framed in a different way to milk much more pathos from it. The blind boy has no hands or arms. A civilian casualty of World War II, he was photographed at an Italian school where he learned to read braille with his lips.
David Seymour was better known by his French pen name, Chim. He was a pioneering photojournalist in the 1930s and later founded the Magnum Photos agency along with Robert Capa and Henri Cartier-Brasson. Chim was known for his humanity and ability to establish the trust of his subjects, particularly the children he photographed. In 1948 UNICEF commissioned him to document the impact of war on children in Europe. This photo comes from that project.

This type of photojournalism is what I grew up with as a kid looking at Life magazine. It reflects a kind of socially engaged photography that fit into larger social projects — think of Edward Steichen’s The Family of Man. It expresses commitment.

Some people look at a photo like this and read into it a hero narrative. Here is a courageous disabled person who has an indomitable will to overcome adversity. I don’t see it quite that way. I believe the qualities of heroism and will to overcome are hard prescriptions to fill. That kind of hero narrative places too much responsibility on the individual rather than the individual in relation to society, which is a more authentic reflection of what the process of disability is.

Nonetheless, I look at this photograph and I still get charged by it. It means a lot to me. In the vocabulary of my visual rhetoric, it represents the process of making adaptations and negotiating accommodations. I truly believe that people with disabilities do this every day. Those adaptations and accommodations are a significant form of cultural production. This is one of my deepest convictions in a life of living with a disability, a life of working as a disability rights activist. Accessibility is creative work. It is not a band-aid or a pathway, something that must be done before one can have culture or consume culture. It is part of culture itself, in the same way that disability is part of the natural spectrum of the human condition.