dinsdag 13 januari 2015

Die Jokers - ein 'gang' Jugendlicher in New York Themenheft . Du, September 1960, Nummer 235.12 Bruce Davidson Photography in the 20th Century Rijksmuseum Amsterdam


DU-Heft; Davidson, Bruce:Die Jokers - ein 'gang' Jugendlicher in New York Themenheft . Du, September 1960, Nummer 235.12 (teils doppelseitige) Aufnahmen umfassende Photoserie über eine New Yorker Jugendgang von Bruce Davidson/Magnum. - Inhalt ausserdem: Erich Lessing/Magnum: Wotruba. Ein Bildbericht Peter Mieg: Louis Moilliet (mit zahlreichen, teils farbigen Abbildungen); Kurt Marti: Karl Barth; Frösche, Kröten, Unken . Aufnahmen und Text von Jakob Forster und Walter Goetz.

See also

MODERN TIMES

Photography in the 20th Century


Author:Matti Boom, Hans Roosenboom

Publisher:nai010, Rijksmuseum

ISBN:978-94-6208-176-5

After the successful reopening of the Rijksmuseum in April of 2013, the museum’s Philips Wing will reopen in November with 'Modern Times', a major survey of twentieth-century photography compiled from the Rijksmuseum’s collection. This collection has grown spectacularly, particularly during the last decade, and now includes many masterpieces by world-famous photographers including André Kertész, Brassaï, Robert Capa, László Moholy-Nagy, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Weegee, William Klein, Cas Oorthuys, and Eva Besnyö.

With more than 350 photographs, the book 'Modern Times. Photography in the 20th Century' forms an impressive overview of the developments that took place during the twentieth century in photography, which grew by leaps and bounds into the ubiquitous and influential medium that we know today.
In 1959, the 25-year-old photographer embedded himself with a gang of teenage New Yorkers to create a moving portrait of postwar inner-city youth culture

In 1959, there were about 1,000 gang members in New York City, mainly teenage males from ethnically-defined neighbourhoods in the outer boroughs. In the spring of that year, Bruce Davidson read a newspaper article about outbreaks of street fighting in Prospect Park and travelled across the Brooklyn Bridge from Manhattan in search of a gang to photograph.
"I met a group of teenagers called the Jokers," he wrote in the afterword to his seminal book of insider reportage, Brooklyn Gang. "I was 25 and they were about 16. I could easily have been taken for one of them."
The previous year, Davidson had become a member of Magnum, having shown his work to his hero, the agency's co-founder, Henri Cartier-Bresson. In 1958, he had similarly immersed himself in the world of a travelling circus for a series called The Dwarf, in which he photographed a performer with whom he formed a close friendship. "My way of working," he later said, "is to enter an unknown world, explore it over a period of time, and learn from it."
With the Jokers, the boundary between detached observation and immersion in the subject matter became even more blurred. "In time they allowed me to witness their fear, depression and anger," he wrote. "I soon realised that I, too, was feeling their pain. In staying close to them, I uncovered my own feelings of failure, frustration and rage."
Alongside Ed van der Elsken's 1956 work Love On the Left Bank, an altogether more staged kind of social document, Brooklyn Gang stands as one of the first in-depth photographic records of rebellious postwar youth culture. The book is now hard to find and prohibitively expensive to all but the serious collector (about £800 for a first edition, £300 for a second), but the Brooklyn Gang series is included in the first book of the epic three-volume Davidson retrospective,Outside Inside, just published by Steidl.
For several months Davidson followed the Jokers on their endless wanderings around their Brooklyn turf and beyond. He captured them hanging out in Prospect Park, where outdoor dances were held on weekend summer nights, and lounging on the beach at Coney Island. He snapped the young men as they killed time in a neighbourhood diner called Helen's Candy Store. In his photographs, the Jokers look both tough and innocent, uncertain adolescent kids caught in that hinterland between childhood and – this being New York – premature adulthood.
Davidson's black-and-white images are cool and evocative, imbued with a sense of time and place that is palpable. The gang shared a working-class, Italian-Catholic background, but look like they have walked straight off the set of West Side Story. The girls are timelessly hip in tight pants and white tops, with pinned-up piles of jet black or peroxide blonde hair. The male dress style is Italian hipster meets American rockabilly – Sinatra meets Elvis. The threads are sharp, the hairstyles tall and quiffed, and the attitude, as caught by Davidson's camera, is either defiant or aloof to the point of disinterested.
Behind the cool facade, though, lay a world of trouble that began to engulf the Jokers as Davidson trailed them. When Brooklyn Gang was finally reprinted by Twin Palms Press in 1999, it included an extended afterword by a 55-year-old man known as only as Bengie. At 15, Bengie had been one of the youngest members of the Jokers. He recalled his chaotic childhood as the son of alcoholic parents, and the beatings he received at school from priests and nuns. He remembered that the younger Jokers were into "drinking beer, smoking pot, maybe popping a pill here and there", and how the heroin came later, via older gang members. He reminisces over Lefty, "the first of the gang to die", a line later lifted by Morrissey, the great magpie of youth culture, for his song of the same name.
"If you see Jimmie, he's like the Fonz, like James Dean–handsome," Bengie says of Davidson's photographs of one of the older members of the Jokers. "Later, though, the whole family, all six of them – Charlie, Aggie, Katie, Jimmie, the mother and the father – died; wiped out, mostly from drugs."
The saddest story belongs to Cathy, the blonde and beautiful young girl whom Davidson photographed several times and whose reflection he caught unforgettably in a cigarette machine as she fixed her hair while waiting for the Staten Island ferry. "Cathy was beautiful like Brigitte Bardot," Bengie remembers. "Cathy always was there, but outside … Then, some years ago, she put a shotgun in her mouth and blew her head off."
Brooklyn Gang, then, is a document of inner-city youth culture at a time before the term was even coined. It is also a requiem for a bunch of Italian-American kids who bonded and, for a time, found a kind of community that had been denied them elsewhere – at home, in the church, at school. One of Davidson's photographs, a couple entwined in the back seat of a car, has attained a late iconic status after being used by Bob Dylan on his 2008 album, Together Through Life. The blonde-haired girl may even be Cathy.
"Beautiful Cathy was there, always with her honey, Junior," writes Bengie. "It was very sad to see her die. It was very sad to see her because she was so sad. She was always sad, always fixing her hair." You can see her that way in Davidson's great photograph of her standing in front of the cigarette machine, forever young, forever alive.












zondag 11 januari 2015

The Quantified Self Travis Hodges Photography


'The Quantified Self' is the process of self knowledge through self tracking.
Once the preserve of researchers and technology junkies, self tracking is rapidly evolving into a mainstream trend as people are able to use smartphones and wearable sensors to record an expanding range of data and make use of its analysis.
Many of the commonly tracked metrics relate to health and self improvement, but almost anything can be tracked; sleep, exercise, mood, weight, the list is almost endless as are the individual motivations for tracking. This project looks at the stories of the people who self track, the data they collect and their motivations for doing so.



donderdag 8 januari 2015

Three (photo)Books on a Desert Island by micamera Photography


Three photobooks on a desert island - Bruno Ceschel - December 2012 from MiCamera on Vimeo.

A project Micamera started in 2012. A very simple question, not so obvious answers.
In December 2012, if Bruno Ceschel had been sent to a desert island, he would have chosen these books:

The Male Nude
David Leddick
TASCHEN, 1998


Vanilla Partner
Torbjørn Rødland
Mack Books, 2012
His own family album
Bruno Ceschel is a writer, curator, and publisher whose works focuses principally on contemporary photography. His research specifically aims to explore issues relating to identities, with an emphasis on gender, sexuality, and racial formation. He is also the founder of Self Publish, Be Happy, an organisation which aims to collect and study contemporary artists’ books and has an ever-travelling mobile library project.
Ceschel writes regularly for various international publications. He has published and edited numerous photography books, and participated in events at numerous institutions including the ICA (London), the Whitechapel Gallery (London), TATE Modern (London), C/O (Berlin) and PS1 (New York), amongst others.
video: Gaia Giani
mounting: Maresa Lippolis
Videos are made in the bookstore in Milan micamera.com 

Three photobooks on a desert island - Willem van Zoetendaal - February 2013 from MiCamera on Vimeo.

In February 2013, if Willem van Zoetendaal had been sent to a desert island or to prison, he would have chosen these books:


De Bergpapoea’s van Nieuw-Guinea en hun woongebied
C.C.F.M. Le Roux


Hans-Ulrich Schlumpf
Armand Schulthess. Rekonstruktion eines Universums
Patrick Frey


Alfred Stieglitz: The Key Set
Abrams
Willem van Zoetendaal is a graphic designer who has been producing photography books since the early nineties. In 1994 he started publishing his own books, first under the name of Basalt (in collaboration with Frido Troost) and then under the name of Van Zoetendaal Publishers. vanzoetendaal.com
video: Gaia Giani
mounting: Maresa Lippolis

Machiel Botman - Three Books on a Desert Island from MiCamera on Vimeo.

This is an extract from a (short) interview that Giulia Zorzi made to Machiel Botman on the day of the opening of One Tree at micamera (September 20, 2012). The question was: If you would have to choose three books to bring on a desert island, which ones would you pick?
The answer is very interesting, and this is the reason we decided to publish the video - though the audio is not so good...
Thank you Piero Pezzoni for the video



woensdag 7 januari 2015

Hungry Horse Montana 2014 Pieter Ten Hoopen Photography



Pieter Ten Hoopen
Hungry Horse, Montana
2014

During a cold winter in the year 1900 two horses ran away. The horses were named Tex and Jerry and lived in the wilderness. After a month the horses returned dying of hunger. From this day they called this small town Hungry Horse.

In the 1940’s and 1950’s a large dam was being built just on the outskirt of the town. People from all over the state moved to Hungry Horse in order to work on the dam’s construction. Ground and houses were cheap, the small town grew fast.

When the dam was completed many moved out but some stayed. Jobs had disappeared and Hungry Horse became a place for criminals to hide since the police wouldn’t venture into the valley.

Hungry Horse is located just a few miles away from Glacier National Park, one of Montana’s greatest tourist attraction. The town today is a place where people pass by on their way to the National Park.

About 70% of the people of Hungry Horse live in trailer parks. The prices for ground and houses in the valley are extremely high. Meaning people are moving away with their trailers in search of cheaper places. Many end up in the Indian reservations on the other side of the park.

One of the main problem in Hungry Horse and in many remote parts of Montana is the use and abuse of Crystal Meth. This drug, mostly made of household products, is smoked or injected. It is considered by many as one of the most destructive drug ever.

During summer some tourists come to the village to buy huckleberry on their way to the National Park. 




maandag 5 januari 2015

Mise Au Jour Johan van der Keuken photo-eye’s Best Books of 2014 Roger Willems Photography


Another careful and devoted production by Willem van Zoetendaal with the legacy of Johan van der Keuken (1938-2001). Such a gentle work. - See more at: http://blog.photoeye.com/2014/12/best-books-2014-roger-willems.html#sthash.HChJttPi.dpuf


Johan Van Der Keuken - Mise Au Jour


Publisher Van Zoetendaal Publishers
ISBN 9789072532275

Published by Van Zoetendaal, this special collection of photographs by Dutch documentary filmmaker, author, and photographer Johan van der Keuken offers a fascinating window into the everyday lives of people through portraits, personal moments and many street scenes. With a career that spanned four decades, Van der Keuken was a prolific producer of images of his time, traveling to Greece, Italy, Spain and France, and visiting and documenting iconic cities like New York, Paris and his native Amsterdam. With full-page reproductions, of his black-and-white images this volume illuminates timeless narratives of people and the city.

112 p, ills bw, 21 x 33 cm, pb, English












dinsdag 30 december 2014

Aircraft The New Vision Le Corbusier MODERN TIMES Photography in the 20th Century Rijksmuseum Amsterdam


LE CORBUSIER: Aircraft

LE CORBUSIER, Aircraft. «L'avion accuse...». / By LE CORBUSIER. – London, New York: The Studio 1935. – 25,2 x 19,0 cm. 16 S. Text, [80] S. Tafeln mit 124 Tiefdruck-Abb. Ganzleinenband. Fotografischer Schutzumschlag. − (The New Vision)

A republication of the original book by Le Corbusier. "'The airplane is the symbol of the new age,' declared Le Corbusier in the introduction to this book, first published in 1935. 'A new state of modern conscience. A new plastic vision. A new aesthetic.' In its paean to the 'joyous and productive impulse of the new machine-civilsation' this book, written by the master architect of Modernism, explores two themes. Firstly, it celebrates the sheer beauty of the airplanes themselves and the 'functional' spareness of their parts and elements - wingspars and propellors, engine frames and ailerons are contrasted with the godlike qualities of the aviators - 'once in the air, they exult in the daring of their departure.' Secondly there is the discovery of the aerial images, the bird's eye view as 'a new function added to our sense, a new standard of measurement, a new basis of sensation.' With unconscious irony, Corbusier predicts that the airplane 'indicts the city': 'cities must be extricated from their misery, come what may. Whole quarters of them must be destroyed and new cities built.' The commanding vigor of the text is matched by a dynamic range of illustrations, selected and laid out by Le Corbusier himself, a dramatic image of an aircraft carrier bears the title 'and Neptune rises from the sea, crowned with strange garlands, the weapons of Mars'. The result is a book that encapsulates the enthusiasm and excitement of the first aerial age, and the stimulus the airplane gave to the visual and intellectual ideas of the time." -- from interior flap. Printed in black-and-white. Includes list of illustrations.

See Book Review: "Aircraft" by Le Corbusier by Michael DiTullo 

&

propagandaphotos  Aircraft – Le Corbusier

See also

MODERN TIMES

Photography in the 20th Century


Author:Matti Boom, Hans Roosenboom

Publisher:nai010, Rijksmuseum

ISBN:978-94-6208-176-5

After the successful reopening of the Rijksmuseum in April of 2013, the museum’s Philips Wing will reopen in November with 'Modern Times', a major survey of twentieth-century photography compiled from the Rijksmuseum’s collection. This collection has grown spectacularly, particularly during the last decade, and now includes many masterpieces by world-famous photographers including André Kertész, Brassaï, Robert Capa, László Moholy-Nagy, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Weegee, William Klein, Cas Oorthuys, and Eva Besnyö.

With more than 350 photographs, the book 'Modern Times. Photography in the 20th Century' forms an impressive overview of the developments that took place during the twentieth century in photography, which grew by leaps and bounds into the ubiquitous and influential medium that we know today.